January 2017
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For the past two centuries, scholars have attempted to derive orthodox Christian theology by reading the New Testament. They have, however, insisted that any contemporary theology be based on historical-critical exegesis of the ancient text, taking the meaning relevant for today from what scholars decide was the meaning intended by the original author or understood … Continue reading
The notion of “vernacular theology” has developed in reference to a body of Christian texts in vernacular languages that emerged during the late middle ages in lay or semi-lay circles. These texts and artifacts (music, images) address questions and practices of devotion, as well as theological issues and problems. They articulate positions outside of, and … Continue reading
The notion of “vernacular theology” has developed in reference to a body of Christian texts in vernacular languages that emerged during the late middle ages in lay or semi-lay circles. These texts and artifacts (music, images) address questions and practices of devotion, as well as theological issues and problems. They articulate positions outside of, and … Continue reading
Liberation theology died in the 1980s. Or did it? Some of the most perceptive critics of capitalism today are thinkers such as Alasdair MacIntyre, Terry Eagleton, and Eugene McCarraher, who seek to combine various Marxist insights with orthodox Catholic theology. Less well known are a younger group of Catholic intellectuals—perhaps most notably Elizabeth Stoker Bruenig—who … Continue reading
By now most universities recognize that the religious dimensions of culture and experience are too important, and potentially too dangerous, either to be neglected by our educational institutions or to be consigned exclusively to religious institutions to study.  But should the study of religion in universities include theology, which, after all, is rightly regarded as … Continue reading
Jason Sexton is a 2016-2017 Visiting Fellow of the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion. He is a Lecturer in the Honors Program at Cal State Fullerton, where he teaches a variety of interdisciplinary courses. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of St. Andrews, and has written widely in the areas of California … Continue reading
This is the keynote lecture of a multi-day event; see additional programming here and here. This presentation takes theories of communication and philosophy of alterity as a starting point to study the methodology of the history of contact between cultures. It first discusses three different frameworks that have been employed in the study of the … Continue reading
Robert Hymes received his B.A. from Columbia College (1972), and his M.A. (1976) and Ph.D. (1979) from the University of Pennsylvania. His work so far has focused on the social and cultural history of middle period and early modern China, drawing questions and sometimes data from cultural anthropology as well as history, and using the … Continue reading
Professor Barkey is a major figure in comparative and historical sociology, whose work on the Ottoman Empire illuminates how empires have managed ethnic and religious difference in comparative and historical perspective. Her works include: Bandits and Bureaucrats: The Ottoman Route to State Centralization (Cornell University Press, 1999) and Empire of Difference: The Ottomans in Comparative Perspective (Cambridge University Press, … Continue reading
This workshop gathers scholars who are interested in the myriad recent critiques of secularism spanning a variety of academic fields: history, political science, anthropology, comparative literature, etc. Our aim is to discuss the various motives for these critiques, their implications, and what alternatives, if any, they put forward. What implications, for instance, does the critique … Continue reading