Upcoming

Marilynne Robinson, Novelist

Marilynne Robinson is a professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop and author of Gilead, which won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the 2004 National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction. She is also the author of four books of nonfiction, The Death of AdamAbsence of MindWhen I Was a Child I Read Books, and Mother Country. In 2013, Robinson was awarded the National Humanities Medal. Her lecture considers the question of audience in the work of Shakespeare and is followed by a response from Jeffrey Knapp (English).

At 6:00 pm, Marilynne Robinson also participates in a panel discussion with Dorothy Hale (English), Jonathan Sheehan (History), and Robert Hass (English) titled “Religion and the Art of the Novel.”

Co-presented with The Doreen B. Townsend Center for the Humanities.

Author Marilynne Robinson is joined in discussion by UC Berkeley faculty panelists Dorothy Hale (English), Jonathan Sheehan (History), and Robert Hass (English).

Robinson is a professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop and author of Gilead, which won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the 2004 National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction. She is also the author of four books of nonfiction, The Death of AdamAbsence of MindWhen I Was a Child I Read Books, and Mother Country. In 2013, Robinson was awarded the National Humanities Medal.

Marilynne Robinson will also offer a public lecture at 1:00 pm titled “Shakespeare: The Question of Audience.”

Co-presented with The Doreen B. Townsend Center for the Humanities

Randy Schekman, Nobel Laureate, Cell Biologist, Gibor Basri, Vice Chancellor of Equity and Inclusion, Astronomer, Carla Hesse, Dean of Letters and Sciences, Historian, UC Berkeley, Maura Nolan, Director of Berkeley Connect, English

A Nobel Laureate, an Astronomer, an Historian, and a Poet in conversation about their conceptions, or lack thereof, of God.

RSVP at berkeleyhillel.org

Co-presented with Berkeley Hillel, the Center for Jewish Studies, and Newman Hall.

William Littman, Senior Adjunct Professor of Architecture and Visual Studies, California College of the Arts

For more than a century, Bay Area architects have created some of the nation’s most innovative religious architecture, ranging from the First Church of Christ, Scientist in Berkeley by Bernard Maybeck to the award-winning Congregation Beth Sholom Synagogue in San Francisco designed by Stanley Saitowitz in 2009. This talk explores the history of experimental and radical religious architecture in Northern California, with a special focus on design after the Second World War, as architects responded to changes in liturgical practices in the Roman Catholic Church after Vatican II as well as the progressive ideals of Protestant and Jewish congregations in the region. It also explores the contribution of 1960s countercultural groups that further pushed the boundaries of religious architecture, often using forms borrowed from Native American and Buddhist religious traditions.(Littmann)

William Littmann is a Senior Adjunct Professor at the California College of the Arts, teaching architectural history in the Architecture and Visual Studies departments. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley and his M.A. in print journalism from Columbia University. Recent areas of study include the landscape and architecture of Japanese incarceration during World War II, farmworker communities in California Central Valley, and a history of the El Camino Real corridor in California from Native American settlement to the rise of Silicon Valley.

Sara McClintock, Associate Professor of Tibetan and Indian Buddhism, Emory University

Sara McClintock is Associate Professor of Religion at Emory University, where she teaches courses in Indian and Tibetan Buddhism and interpretation theory in the study of religion. She obtained her bachelor’s degree in fine arts from Bryn Mawr College (1983), her master’s degree in world religions from Harvard Divinity School (1989), and her doctorate in religion from Harvard University (2002). Her interests include narrative, philosophy, and contemplative practices, with particular focus on issues of rationality, rhetoric, reading, embodiment, emptiness, and ethics. She is author of Omniscience and the Rhetoric of Reason: Santaraksita and Kamalasila on Rationality, Argumentation, and Religious Authority (2010) and co-editor with Georges Dreyfus of The Svatantrika-Prasangika Distinction: What Difference Does a Difference Make? (2003). Recent writings include “Compassionate Trickster: The Buddha as a Literary Character in the Narratives of Early Indian Buddhism” (2011) and an article on the status of phenomenal content (akara) in cognition in Kamalasila’s Tattvasamgrahapanjika (2013). She is co-translator with John Dunne of Nagarjuna’s Ratnavali.

Co-presented by the Center for Buddhist Studies.

Webb Keane, George Herbert Mead Collegiate Professor of Anthropology, University of Michican, Ann Arbor

Fanny Howe, Poet, Essayist, Novelist

Co-presented by the Holloway Poetry Series.