Upcoming

Tony Street, Director of Islamic Studies, University of Cambridge

Dr. Tony Street, the Hartwell Director of Islamic Studies at the University of Cambridge, leads four sessions on arguably the most important logic text of pre-modern Islam. The readings will be circulated in Arabic and in English translation. All are welcome to attend. Workshops take place September 23, September 25, September 30 and October 2.

Tony Street is the Hartwell Assistant Director of Research in Islamic Studies at the Faculty of Divinity and Fellow of Clare Hall, University of Cambridge. He finished his doctorate in 1988 on doctrines on the angels in the writings of Fakhr al-Din al-Razi (d. 1210), under the supervision of Tony Johns (ANU) and Georges Anawati (IDEO). Seduced by Razi’s logical approach to theological problems, he began to work on Razi’s logical writings, which ultimately led to work on Avicenna’s foundational texts on logic. A leading scholar of his generation on Arabo-Islamic logic, Dr. Street has published a number of seminal studies on aspects of the logic of Avicenna, Suhrawardi, Razi, Tusi and Katibi.

Co-presented by the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, the Mellon Foundation, and the Department of Near Eastern Studies.

Tony Street, Director of Islamic Studies, University of Cambridge

Dr. Tony Street, the Hartwell Director of Islamic Studies at the University of Cambridge, leads four sessions on arguably the most important logic text of pre-modern Islam. The readings will be circulated in Arabic and in English translation. All are welcome to attend. Workshops take place September 23, September 25, September 30 and October 2.

Tony Street is the Hartwell Assistant Director of Research in Islamic Studies at the Faculty of Divinity and Fellow of Clare Hall, University of Cambridge. He finished his doctorate in 1988 on doctrines on the angels in the writings of Fakhr al-Din al-Razi (d. 1210), under the supervision of Tony Johns (ANU) and Georges Anawati (IDEO). Seduced by Razi’s logical approach to theological problems, he began to work on Razi’s logical writings, which ultimately led to work on Avicenna’s foundational texts on logic. A leading scholar of his generation on Arabo-Islamic logic, Dr. Street has published a number of seminal studies on aspects of the logic of Avicenna, Suhrawardi, Razi, Tusi and Katibi.

Co-presented by the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, the Mellon Foundation, and the Department of Near Eastern Studies.

Tony Street, Director of Islamic Studies, University of Cambridge

Dr. Tony Street, the Hartwell Director of Islamic Studies at the University of Cambridge, leads four sessions on arguably the most important logic text of pre-modern Islam. The readings will be circulated in Arabic and in English translation. All are welcome to attend. Workshops take place September 23, September 25, September 30 and October 2.

Tony Street is the Hartwell Assistant Director of Research in Islamic Studies at the Faculty of Divinity and Fellow of Clare Hall, University of Cambridge. He finished his doctorate in 1988 on doctrines on the angels in the writings of Fakhr al-Din al-Razi (d. 1210), under the supervision of Tony Johns (ANU) and Georges Anawati (IDEO). Seduced by Razi’s logical approach to theological problems, he began to work on Razi’s logical writings, which ultimately led to work on Avicenna’s foundational texts on logic. A leading scholar of his generation on Arabo-Islamic logic, Dr. Street has published a number of seminal studies on aspects of the logic of Avicenna, Suhrawardi, Razi, Tusi and Katibi.

Co-presented by the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, the Mellon Foundation, and the Department of Near Eastern Studies.

David Mungello, Professor of History, Baylor University

The Catholic Invasion of China, 1841-2000 is a subject that has undergone a great reevaluation during the last half-century. In the 1960s, it was viewed as nearly synonymous with the experience of Western imperialism. The physical incursion into China of thousands of religious ended with the expulsion of the missionaries in 1951, but the mental framework that gave rise to this incursion persisted throughout the twentieth century. The anti-Catholic campaign of Communist persecution and imprisonment led to spiritual growth rather than decline, a development that was completely misread by most foreign journalists and academics. Viewed from a short-term historical perspective, the Catholic invasion of nineteenth and twentieth-century China was a very negative experience –a debacle- but viewed from a long-term perspective, the invasion contributed to the transformation of a mission church into an indigenous religion. In the process, the Catholic invasion enriched Chinese culture while the Chinese church enriched Catholicism and made it more universal. The present division between the patriotic and underground Catholic churches is likely to remain unresolved until there has been some accommodation between the twin issues of the Vatican’s foreign interference in Chinese affairs and the Chinese state’s restrictions on the free practice of religion. (Mungello)

David Mungello, the grandson of Neapolitan immigrants, was raised in a small town in southwestern Pennsylvania, and graduated from George Washington University where he majored in Philosophy. He came to U.C. Berkeley in 1967 to study with Prof. Joseph R. Levenson and completed his doctorate in History in 1973. He has taught at colleges in Hong Kong, New York, Iowa, Düsseldorf and, since 1994, at Baylor University, Texas. He has done post-doctoral research in Germany on an Alexander von Humboldt fellowship (1978-80) and a Herzog August Bibliothek Wolfenbüettel fellowship (1984). In 1979, he founded the Sino-Western Cultural Relations Journal. He was one of the first foreign scholars to visit the former Jesuit Xujiahui (Zikawei) library, Shanghai in 1986 and he was in Beijing and Hangzhou during the June 4th 1989 Tiananmen Square Incident. He has published eight books, including Curious Land: Jesuit Accommodation and the Origins of Sinology (1985), The Spirit and the Flesh in Shandong, 1650-1785 (2001), The Great Encounter of China and the West, 1500-1800 (4th revised edition 2013), Drowning Girls in China: Female Infanticide since 1650 (2008), and Western Queers in China: Flight to the Land of Oz (2012).

Co-presented by the USF Ricci Institute for Chinese-Western Cultural History.

Tony Street, Director of Islamic Studies, University of Cambridge

Dr. Tony Street, the Hartwell Director of Islamic Studies at the University of Cambridge, leads four sessions on arguably the most important logic text of pre-modern Islam. The readings will be circulated in Arabic and in English translation. All are welcome to attend. Workshops take place September 23, September 25, September 30 and October 2.

Tony Street is the Hartwell Assistant Director of Research in Islamic Studies at the Faculty of Divinity and Fellow of Clare Hall, University of Cambridge. He finished his doctorate in 1988 on doctrines on the angels in the writings of Fakhr al-Din al-Razi (d. 1210), under the supervision of Tony Johns (ANU) and Georges Anawati (IDEO). Seduced by Razi’s logical approach to theological problems, he began to work on Razi’s logical writings, which ultimately led to work on Avicenna’s foundational texts on logic. A leading scholar of his generation on Arabo-Islamic logic, Dr. Street has published a number of seminal studies on aspects of the logic of Avicenna, Suhrawardi, Razi, Tusi and Katibi.

Co-presented by the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, the Mellon Foundation, and the Department of Near Eastern Studies.

Winnifred Sullivan, Professor of Religious Studies and Law, Indiana University

A persistent question in considering the proper scope for legal protection for religious freedom is whether any such protection should extend to groups as well as to individuals. Countless US laws give special legal privileges to churches—and, sometimes, by an imperfect analogy, to other religious groups or organizations, but in US law a religious group has almost always meant a church or church-related institution of some kind.

This lecture will explore the religious phenomenology — the political theology — of the US Supreme Court’s theory of corporate religious rights, setting its recent decisions in Hosanna-Tabor v EEOC and Burwell v Hobby Lobby in a longer historical and ecclesiological frame. Can it ever be constitutional for the US Supreme Court to refer to “the church?” (Sullivan)

Winnifred Fallers Sullivan is Professor of Religious Studies and Chair, Department of Religious Studies, and Affiliate Professor of Law, Maurer School of Law at Indiana University, Bloomington. She studies the intersection of religion and law in the modern period, particularly the phenomenology of modern religion as it is shaped in its encounter with law. She is the author of Paying the Words Extra: Religious Discourse in the Supreme Court of the United States (Cambridge: Harvard University Center for the Study of World Religions, 1994); The Impossibility of Religious Freedom (Princeton, 2005), Prison Religion: Faith-based Reform and the Constitution (Princeton, 2009), and A Ministry of Presence (Chicago 2014).

The Berkeley Lecture on Religious Tolerance is sponsored by the Endowed Fund for the Study of Religious Tolerance.

Colloquium with Winnifred Sullivan, Professor of Religious Studies and Law, Indiana University

BCSR presents a colloquium with Professor Winnifred Sullivan on her paper, “Proving Religion: What Evidence is Relevant?” To receive the paper, please contact info.bcsr@berkeley.edu by Wednesday, October 15.

All talk of special accommodations for religiously motivated persons, or separation of religion from government, presumes a capacity to give an account of what religion is. Often what counts as religion in such situations is implicit, largely by assumed analogy to majority religious traditions; often it is strategically deliberately left ambiguous. We shout at each other about whether religion belongs or not in the public square and whether religious folks ought to have privileged exemptions from laws that apply to everyone else. But “religion” operates largely as a black box in these contests. Occasionally what counts as religion is explicitly addressed by courts and administrators and legislators. Even then there is little consistency among these various accounts.

The familiar challenge of the incoherence of the category (at least to religion scholars) is explored here in the larger context of the crisis of the relevance and admissibility of expert evidence in the US courts. What evidence is relevant in proving religion? Subjective witness by a party? Testimony by a cleric? Authoritative religious texts? Expert reports by religious studies scholars? Who decides and how? What theories of law and of religion are implied by these various alternatives? (Sullivan)

The Berkeley Lecture on Religious Tolerance and colloquium are sponsored by the Endowed Fund for the Study of Religious Tolerance

Marilynne Robinson, Novelist

Marilynne Robinson is a professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop and author of Gilead, which won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the 2004 National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction. She is also the author of four books of nonfiction, The Death of AdamAbsence of MindWhen I Was a Child I Read Books, and Mother Country. In 2013, Robinson was awarded the National Humanities Medal. Her lecture considers the question of audience in the work of Shakespeare and is followed by a response from Jeffrey Knapp (English).

At 6:00 pm, Marilynne Robinson also participates in a panel discussion with Dorothy Hale (English), Jonathan Sheehan (History), and Robert Hass (English) titled “Religion and the Art of the Novel.”

Co-presented with The Doreen B. Townsend Center for the Humanities.

Author Marilynne Robinson is joined in discussion by UC Berkeley faculty panelists Dorothy Hale (English), Jonathan Sheehan (History), and Robert Hass (English).

Robinson is a professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop and author of Gilead, which won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the 2004 National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction. She is also the author of four books of nonfiction, The Death of AdamAbsence of MindWhen I Was a Child I Read Books, and Mother Country. In 2013, Robinson was awarded the National Humanities Medal.

Marilynne Robinson will also offer a public lecture at 1:00 pm titled “Shakespeare: The Question of Audience.”

Co-presented with The Doreen B. Townsend Center for the Humanities

William Littman, Senior Adjunct Professor of Architecture and Visual Studies, California College of the Arts

For more than a century, Bay Area architects have created some of the nation’s most innovative religious architecture, ranging from the First Church of Christ, Scientist in Berkeley by Bernard Maybeck to the award-winning Congregation Beth Sholom Synagogue in San Francisco designed by Stanley Saitowitz in 2009. This talk explores the history of experimental and radical religious architecture in Northern California, with a special focus on design after the Second World War, as architects responded to changes in liturgical practices in the Roman Catholic Church after Vatican II as well as the progressive ideals of Protestant and Jewish congregations in the region. It also explores the contribution of 1960s countercultural groups that further pushed the boundaries of religious architecture, often using forms borrowed from Native American and Buddhist religious traditions.(Littmann)

William Littmann is a Senior Adjunct Professor at the California College of the Arts, teaching architectural history in the Architecture and Visual Studies departments. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley and his M.A. in print journalism from Columbia University. Recent areas of study include the landscape and architecture of Japanese incarceration during World War II, farmworker communities in California Central Valley, and a history of the El Camino Real corridor in California from Native American settlement to the rise of Silicon Valley.

Sara McClintock, Associate Professor of Tibetan and Indian Buddhism, Emory University

Sara McClintock is Associate Professor of Religion at Emory University, where she teaches courses in Indian and Tibetan Buddhism and interpretation theory in the study of religion. She obtained her bachelor’s degree in fine arts from Bryn Mawr College (1983), her master’s degree in world religions from Harvard Divinity School (1989), and her doctorate in religion from Harvard University (2002). Her interests include narrative, philosophy, and contemplative practices, with particular focus on issues of rationality, rhetoric, reading, embodiment, emptiness, and ethics. She is author of Omniscience and the Rhetoric of Reason: Santaraksita and Kamalasila on Rationality, Argumentation, and Religious Authority (2010) and co-editor with Georges Dreyfus of The Svatantrika-Prasangika Distinction: What Difference Does a Difference Make? (2003). Recent writings include “Compassionate Trickster: The Buddha as a Literary Character in the Narratives of Early Indian Buddhism” (2011) and an article on the status of phenomenal content (akara) in cognition in Kamalasila’s Tattvasamgrahapanjika (2013). She is co-translator with John Dunne of Nagarjuna’s Ratnavali.

Co-presented by the Center for Buddhist Studies.

Webb Keane, George Herbert Mead Collegiate Professor of Anthropology, University of Michican, Ann Arbor

Fanny Howe, Poet, Essayist, Novelist

Co-presented by the Holloway Poetry Series.