Community Outreach Program

For 2021-2022, the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion at UC Berkeley is delighted to announce a new Community Outreach Program.

BCSR is offering free interactive presentations and workshops by experts about the place of religion in our world today and the history of religion since antiquity. A vital part of the BCSR’s mission is to connect research on religion that happens inside UC Berkeley to our broader and more diverse community beyond the walls of campus, in the East Bay and beyond. Through this program, aimed at general and young audiences, we hope to promote religious literacy, cultural knowledge and an insight into the latest academic work. This program is being supported for this first year by the Democracy and Public Theology Program, generously funded by the Henry Luce Foundation.

UC Berkeley graduate students, future professors and thought-leaders, will come to schools or community groups and will adapt their presentations to the needs of your group or class. The sessions are carefully designed to be non-sectarian and to engage audiences in big questions about religion and society. They are suitable for History, Social Studies, Ethics, Philosophy classes and for diverse groups.

The presentations on offer are listed below, with format (in-person/Zoom) and available periods indicated. To request a presentation, please fill out this online form and we will be in touch as soon as possible. Not all presentations are available for all dates and times (depending on presenter availability), but we will endeavor to accommodate your needs.


Available Presentations:

To request any one of these presentations, please fill out this form and we will be in touch as soon as possible.


“Is Religious Freedom for Everyone?”
Courtney Bither

Religion is everywhere—and in the United States, religious freedom can seem like a buzzword. This presentation invites participants to think about how religious identity is understood in the United States: who counts as religious? Whose religious freedoms are protected? And why does this matter?

This talk is available September 2021 to early May 2022 this talk is available online or in-person in the East Bay Area. To request this presentation, please fill out this form and we will be in touch as soon as possible.


“Religion in Outer Space Over Time”
Yesenia Brambila

In most ancient societies, the night sky had been observed and interpreted within a religious context. Constellations were explained in mythologies and the appearance of celestial phenomena, e.g. comets and eclipses, were understood as omens. Although today outer space is mainly a place of scientific inquiry, scientists over time have maintained the traditions of ancient religions by using the names they gave to celestial bodies and continuing to draw the names for new discoveries and space missions from ancient cultures. Furthermore, popular culture’s interest in astrology today, e.g. the zodiacs and horoscopes, stem from astrological beliefs found in ancient religions.

This talk is available September 2021 to early May 2022; this talk is available in-person in the East Bay Area. To request this presentation, please fill out this form and we will be in touch as soon as possible.


“What Does Christian Conversion Look Like? From Saint Paul to the Reformation”
Simon Brown

How do you know someone has arrived at “true religion” if you can’t take their word for it? This question confronted missionaries with special urgency during the Protestant Reformation, when claiming Christian identity became particularly controversial. This talk will explore how preachers, missionaries and inquisitors in the 1500s and 1600s tested for “real” conversions. It will begin with Biblical precedents that depicted conversions, like the exemplary case of Saint Paul, and show how experiences of religious conflict and Christian missions beyond Europe challenged them. Those missions and their violent encounters with non-Christian religions presented alternative forms of conversion.

This talk is available September 2021 to early May 2022; this talk is available online or in-person in the East Bay Area. To request this presentation, please fill out this form and we will be in touch as soon as possible.


“Meeting on Sacred Ground: How Do Multi-Religious Communities Interact in Religious Spaces?”
Aparajita Das

From Jerusalem to Ayodhya to the Caucasus, the recent past has seen sacred sites (mosques, churches, temples and monasteries) often become battle-zones with communities fighting each other for control. But how did people behave in these historical spaces in the deeper past?

This lecture will utilize some historical examples of social interactions from South Asia to ask how ordinary people outside the contemporary West have lived with the sacred sites that dot their everyday lives: tombs, temples, monasteries, shrines and mosques. Second, it will ask how we can soundly handle this material. How do historians cope with the differing sensibilities of religion that have developed from pre-modern to contemporary times?

This talk is available September 2021 to early May 2022; this talk is available online or in-person in the East Bay Area. To request this presentation, please fill out this form and we will be in touch as soon as possible.


“When God Became History: the Philosophical Origins of ‘Systemic’ Injustice?”
Shterna Friedman

Why do we tend to treat a social system as a cause of social patterns, having its own features and qualities as if it were a human being? Why do we tend to talk about present injustices by pointing to the historical origins of injustice? It was once common to agonize over how God can permit injustice; we now agonize over how history and society can permit injustice. This presentation will examine how famous philosophers like Immanuel Kant, G. W. F. Hegel, and Karl Marx replaced God with history as the cause of systemic good and evil, justice and injustice. This presentation would be appropriate for classes on ethics and philosophy and for groups interested in philosophy and history.

This talk is available September 2021 to early May 2022; this talk is available online only. To request this presentation, please fill out this form and we will be in touch as soon as possible.


“The Long History of Religious Fundamentalism” 
Sourav Ghosh 

In recent times, the disturbing images from the Hamid Karzai International Airport at Kabul have startled the world population. The rise and ascendancy of the Taliban forces in Afghanistan have centrally placed the question of the role of religious fundamentalism in modern-day politics. But religious fundamentalism is not new. This presentation will focus on the history of religious fundamentalism in the last five centuries across South Asia, the Middle East, and Europe. The presentation will include discussion of religious fundamentalism in Hinduism, Islam, and Christianity.

This talk is available September 2021 to early May 2022; this talk is available online only. To request this presentation, please fill out this form and we will be in touch as soon as possible.


“Changing Peoples, Changing Steeples: Religion in Manhattan, 1939–1999”
Casey Philip Homan

This presentation investigates how religious congregations (churches, synagogues, etc.) in Manhattan changed during the 1939–1999 period and shows how key urban trends may have driven the change. Unexpectedly, the number of congregations was increasing while the population of Manhattan was decreasing. This presentation argues that white flight and increasing black wealth led the number of congregations per capita in Manhattan to increase from 1939 through the mid-1960s. From the mid-1960s onward, as depopulation and urban decay prevented black wealth in Manhattan from continuing to rise, the number of congregations per capita stagnated. A substantial increase in immigration prevented congregations per capita from dropping. There is reason to believe that this story of religion in Manhattan may apply to various other large U.S. cities as well. This presentation is suitable for social studies classes and groups interested in religious trends in contemporary America.

This talk is available September 2021 to early May 2022; this talk is available online or in-person in the East Bay Area. To request this presentation, please fill out this form and we will be in touch as soon as possible.


“God? Martyr? Saint? The Divine Emperors of the Roman Empire”
Flavio Santini

Starting from fascinating written and visual sources, this presentation will introduce the audience to the divine Roman emperors from the birth of the Roman empire to its collapse (31 BCE–476 CE). What were the challenges facing Roman emperors and their advisors in finding appropriate ways to represent the divinity of the emperor? What if the emperor was a boy, or even a Christian? In this presentation, we will try to answer these questions. In particular, we will focus on how Christianity radically changed the conception of the emperors’ divinity.

This talk is available January 2022 to early May 2022; this talk is available online or in-person in the East Bay Area. To request this presentation, please fill out this form and we will be in touch as soon as possible.